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Influenza and the Risk of Viral Pneumonia - curtcasey1 - 08-04-2016 11:43 PM

Asthmatic Bronchitis - Influenza and the Risk of Viral Pneumonia
Influenza, commonly known as 'the flu', is an infectious disease generally caused by viruses. The viruses responsible for causing the flu during viral outbreaks are very contagious and they can easily be contracted by entering in contact with infected people. Flu viruses are airborne and they can be transmitted through coughing, sneezing or simply by breathing the same air with contaminated individuals. You can also acquire flu indirectly, by entering in contact with contaminated objects. Thus, impeccable hygiene during flu seasons is recommended as an effective means of preventing infection with flu viruses.

Statistics indicate that around 30-50 million Americans are confronted with influenza during winter outbreaks. While most of these people have no difficulties in coping with the illness, the elderly and people with special conditions (weak immune system, already-existent respiratory affections) often develop serious complications, requiring hospitalization. Recent studies indicate that influenza accounts for more than 000 hospitalizations in the United States each year. Viral pneumonia and other serious diseases associated with complicated flu are responsible for causing 000 annual deaths. We were actually wondering how to get about to writing about Asthma Chronic Bronchitis. However once we started writing, the words just seemed to flow continuously! Wink

Although most people experience no problems in overcoming seasonal maladies such as influenza, the elderly are very susceptible to developing serious complications such as bronchitis, otitis, heart disease and pneumonia. In the case of people with already existent conditions (asthma, chronic bronchitis) and people with weak immune system, flu can degenerate into serious pulmonary diseases such as viral pneumonia. Considering the fact that flu viruses primarily affect the respiratory system, people with respiratory sensibilities are exposed to a high risk of developing pneumonia during the flu seasons.

Is important to note that common medications and remedies used in the treatment of flu can't prevent or overcome viral pneumonia. Pneumonia is a serious infectious disease that requires rigorous treatment with specific medications. If you experience possible symptoms of pneumonia, it is very important to quickly contact your doctor in order to receive the correct medical treatment.

Considering the fact that flu and other seasonal contagious diseases can trigger exacerbated symptoms and lead to serious complications in certain categories of people, it is best to take measures in preventing the occurrence of such maladies in the first place. Doctors strongly recommend people with pronounced susceptibility to infections to get the influenza vaccine every year, before flu outbreaks. Flu vaccines can also prevent against certain forms of viral pneumonia that are caused by common flu viruses. However, flu shots can't prevent the occurrence of bacterial or atypical pneumonia, which require a different type of vaccine. In addition to the influenza vaccine, the categories of persons exposed to a high risk of developing pneumonia should receive a pneumococcal vaccine as well. A single dose of pneumococcal vaccine offers lifetime protection against various forms of pneumonia and the vaccine can be administered at any time of year. Do not judge a book by its cover; so don't just scan through this matter on Asthma Chronic Bronchitis. read it thoroughly to judge its value and importance. Wink

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An Overview of Pneumonia in Community and Hospital Settings


Pneumonia involves inflammation and infection of the lungs that triggers an overproduction of mucus at the level of the respiratory tract. Common symptoms of pneumonia are: difficult, shallow breathing, chest pain and discomfort that intensify with deep breaths, wheezing, exacerbated productive cough and moderate to high fever. Doctors sustain that the occurrence of pneumonia is strongly related to previously acquired infectious diseases such as the flu, which can degenerate into a wide range of complications. There are many forms of pneumonia, most of them triggered by viral infectious agents. Some types of pneumonia are caused by the same viruses responsible for causing influenza or other common seasonal maladies. It is with much interest that we got about to write on Complications Bronchitis. So we do hope that you too read this article with the same, if not more interest!

Introduction Bronchitis is a respiratory disease in which the mucous membrane in the lungs bronchial passages becomes inflamed and usually occurs in the setting of an upper respiratory illness and is observed more frequently in the winter months. It may be short-lived (acute) or chronic, meaning that it lasts a long time and often recurs and can have causes other than an infection. Bronchitis can also occur when acids from your stomach consistently back up into your food pipe, a condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. Both adults and children can get it. If you are a smoker and come down with the acute form, it will be much harder for you to recover. If you continue smoking, you are increasing your chances of developing the chronic form which is a serious long-term disorder that often requires regular medical treatment. If you suffer from chronic bronchitis, you are at risk for developing cardiovascular problems as well as more serious lung diseases and infections, and you should be monitored by a doctor.

Risk Over time, harmful substances in tobacco smoke can permanently damage the airways, increasing the risk for emphysema, cancer, and other serious lung diseases. People at risk for acute bronchitis include: The elderly, infants, and young children, Smokers, People with heart or lung disease. Passive smoke exposure is a risk factor for chronic bronchitis and asthma in adults. Smoking (even for a brief time) and being around tobacco smoke, chemical fumes, and other air pollutants for long periods of time puts a person at risk for developing the disease. Overall, tobacco smoking accounts for as much as 90% of the risk. Secondhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke increases the risk of respiratory infections, augments asthma symptoms, and causes a measurable reduction in pulmonary function. Malnutrition increases the risk of upper respiratory tract infections and subsequent acute bronchitis, especially in children and older people. Revision is very important when writing or speaking about a topic. We had a lot of drafting to do to come to this final product on Bronchitis Doctor.

Conclusion Bronchitis is an inflammation of the air passages within the lungs and may be accompanied by signs and symptoms of an upper respiratory infection, including: Soreness and a feeling of constriction or burning in your chest, Sore throat, Congestion, Breathlessness, Wheezing, Slight fever and chills, Overall malaise.

Most People can Treat Their Symptoms At Home
However, if you have severe or persistent symptoms or if you cough up blood,you should see your doctor. The doctor will recommend that you drink lots of fluids, get plenty of rest, and may suggest using an over-the-counter or prescription cough medicine to relieve your symptoms as you recover. If you do not improve, your doctor may prescribe an inhaler to open your airways. If symptoms are severe, the doctor may order a chest x-ray to exclude pneumonia.

Tobacco and infectious agents are major causes of chronic bronchitis and although found in all age groups, it is diagnosed most frequently in children younger than 5 years. In 1994, it was diagnosed in more than 11 of every 100 children younger than 5 years. Fewer than 5% of people with bronchitis symptomes to develop pneumonia. Most cases clear up on their own in a few days, especially if you rest, drink plenty of fluids, and keep the air in your home warm and moist. If you have repeated bouts of bronchitis, see your doctor.

Symptoms Symptoms lasting up to 90 days are usually classified as acute; symptoms lasting longer, sometimes for months or years, are usually classified as chronic. Signs of Infectious bronchitis generally begins with the symptoms of a common cold: runny nose, sore throat, fatigue, chills, and back and muscle aches. The signs of either type of bronchitis include: Cough that produces mucus; if yellow-green in color, you are more likely to have a bacterial infection, Shortness of breath made worse by exertion or mild activity, Wheezing, Fatigue, Fever -- usually low and Chest discomfort. Additional symptoms include: Frequent respiratory infections (such as colds or the flu), Ankle, feet, and leg swelling, Blue-tinged lips due to low levels of oxygen. We tried to create as much matter for your understanding when writing on Infectious Bronchitis. We do hope that the matter provided here is sufficient to you.